Your Denied or Underpaid Missouri Insurance Claim Can Be Reopened

By James H. Bushart

www.publicadjustermissouri.com

Insurance adjusters hired by insurance companies will often deny legitimate home or business owner claims for property loss … or underpay them.  The chances are great that you are, or know, someone that this has happened to.

Until they have experienced the process, most folks believe that when they suffer an insurable loss to their home or business, all they need to do is contact their insurance company and someone runs out right away with a check to cover all that they need.  They are shocked to learn that, in the middle of their crisis, they are called upon to focus their attention on “proving” their loss while navigating a mine field of conditions and exclusions that often (and mistakenly) result in disappointment.

Public Adjusters do not work for insurance companies.  Instead, they work for insured home and business owners who benefit from assistance in negotiating their claim.It is important to know that … when the dust has settled and you are ready to address the disappointing shortfall … a review of your claim by a licensed Public Adjuster can be your best choice.

I am a Public Adjuster and I offer free consultations to Missouri home and business owners who want to inquire about their past claims and the possibility of recovering money that is owed to them under their insurance policy.  Many other Public Adjusters in other states offer the same service.

Remember that, when it comes to your insurance company, the first offer is usually the lowest and that “No” does not mean “forever”.

For more information, visit www.publicadjustermissouri.com or call me at 314-803-2167.

It’s your money.

Emergency Supply Kit for Severe Weather

Assemble the following items to create kits for use at home, the office, at school and in your vehicle:

  •  Water—1 gallon per person, per day (3-day supply for evacuation and 2 week supply for home)
  •  Food—a 3-day supply of non-perishable food for evacuation, 2-week supply for home
  •  Battery-powered or hand crank radio, and a “Public Alert Certified” NOAA Weather Radio and extra batteries for both
  •  Items for infants—including formula, diapers, bottles, pacifiers, powdered milk and medications not requiring refrigeration
  •  Items for seniors, people with disabilities and anyone with medical needs—including special foods, denture items, extra eyeglasses, hearing aid batteries, prescription and non-prescription medications that are regularly used, inhalers and other essential equipment
  •  Kitchen accessories—a manual can opener, mess kits or disposable cups, plates and utensils, utility knife, sugar and salt, aluminum foil and plastic wrap, resealable plastic bags
  •  One complete change of clothing and footwear for each person— including sturdy work shoes or boots, raingear and other items adjusted for the season, such as hats and gloves, thermal underwear, sunglasses, dust masks
  •  Sanitation and hygiene items—shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrushes, comb and brush, lip balm, sunscreen, contact lenses and supplies and any medications regularly used, toilet paper, towelettes, soap, hand sanitizer, liquid detergent, feminine supplies, plastic garbage bags (heavy-duty) and ties (for personal sanitation), medium-sized plastic bucket with tight lid, disinfectant, household chlorine bleach
  •  Other essential items—paper, pencil, needles, thread, medicine dropper, whistle, emergency preparedness manual
  •  Several flashlights and extra, fresh batteries
  • A first-aid kit
  • A copy of your home owner’s insurance policy
  • Contact information for a pre-selected, local and licensed Public Adjuster

This list was extracted and modified from the information provided at: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/severeweather/resources/ttl6-10.pdf

Prepare for a Home Fire Emergency … Today!

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside sleeping areas.
  • Test your smoke alarms once a month and change the batteries at least once a year.
  • Replace smoke alarms every 8-10 years or as the manufacturer guidelines recommend.
  • Plan your escape from fire. The best plans have two ways to get out of each room.
  • Practice fire escape plans several times a year. Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.
  • Purchase only collapsible escape ladders evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory such as Underwriters Laboratory (UL).
  • Check that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.
  • Make sure everyone in your family understands and practices how to properly operate and open locked or barred doors and windows.
  • Consider installing residential fire sprinklers in your home.
  • Take the time to prepare (and, if possible, photograph or videotape) a complete inventory of all of your belongings.  Store this information with a friend or family member so that it is not lost in the fire.
  • Find and meet a local licensed Public Adjuster to have your home insurance policy reviewed in advance of an emergency and keep his phone number in an accessible place.

Contact your local fire department on a non-emergency phone number if you need help or have questions about fire safety in your home.

How I Can Help When the Insurance Company “Lowballs” Your Settlement

Perhaps you’ve already filed your claim and received a lowball settlement that cannot possibly repair all of the damage to your Missouri property.

If there is money still owed to you by your insurer, I can help you by re-opening your insurance claim and negotiating a fair settlement.

My objective with the adjustment negotiations for your insurance company is a final agreement upon the maximum amount of money that you are entitled to receive under the terms and conditions of the insurance covering the loss.  This amount should coincide with the liability of the insurance company … meaning that, while an insured loss should not result in more than what it would take to restore you to your pre-loss condition, neither should it result in a payment of less.

The claim reopening process will begin with a review all the background documentation and your policy to determine if you were underpaid.  If you were underpaid and wish to hire me, I will contact your insurer and attempt to negotiate a fair settlement with them.  Sometimes, their “No” is simply a request for more information.

It costs you nothing to see if I can help you and if you do not recover additional money, you owe me nothing.

If your insured property is not located in Missouri, seek a public adjuster licensed in your state.

www.publicadjustermissouri.com

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