The Duties of the Insurance Company’s Adjuster and Your Claim

Duties of the insurance company adjuster and your claim

Successfully navigating through the insurance claims process can be challenging for a home or business owner who has suffered loss or damage to their property. Knowing the process and its boundaries and setting reasonable expectations will play a big role in achieving success with the minimum amount of frustration. Knowing what to expect (and what not to expect) from your insurance company’s adjuster is important.

Once an insurance carrier has been notified that a loss has occurred to the property that it insures, the insurer will assign one of its employees or an independent adjuster to investigate and gather information about the claim.

Many policyholders begin this process under the mistaken impression that the adjuster’s job is to assist the policyholder with their claim, but quickly learn that this is not true. It is the burden of the policyholder (not the insurance company’s adjuster) to prove that his loss was caused by a covered peril. The adjuster assigned to the claim is tasked to protect the rights and interests of the insurance carrier and assist the carrier in obtaining and presenting evidence of a policy’s exclusion when it exists.

While it is the burden of the policyholder to prove his loss was caused by a covered peril, it is the burden of the insurance carrier to prove that coverage is excluded under the policy. Presumably, both sides are prepared or preparing to meet their burdens of proof. How does the insurance company’s adjuster go about doing this for his employer?

First, he confirms that the damaged property is the property described in the policy and was at the location described in the policy. If you are claiming an item that you did not insure, or if the insured item was not on the insured property when it was damaged, you might not have a valid claim.

Next, he confirms that the loss occurred during the time period when the policy was in effect. If your roof was damaged by hail and the last hail storm in your area occurred two months prior to the beginning of your coverage, his job is to discover and record that fact.

He will then determine whether or not the loss was caused by a peril covered by your policy. There are many causes for damage that are specifically excluded from an insurance policy.

The adjuster will then determine the extent of the ownership interest of the policyholder in the insured property and the extent of the ownership interest of others in the insured property. If the policyholder shares ownership of the property with others, how much of the damage is his loss and how much might be shared with others?

He will investigate to confirm that the policyholder did not commit fraud or material misrepresentation to procure the insurance policy. If the policyholder withheld material information in his application used to determine risk, for example, coverage under the policy may be rescinded.

The adjuster will confirm whether or not the premises were occupied as permitted or required by the policy. Certain policies negate coverage for loss when the property had been vacant for more than 60 days during the term of the policy.

He will also confirm that, at the time of the loss, there were no conditions that would cause suspension of the coverage.

This is the investigation that the adjuster conducts at the same time he is taking his measurements and photographs of the damage to determine the value of the loss, should it be paid. These are the purposes behind his questions as he conducts his investigation to first determine IF the insurance company will pay before determining how much money the carrier might offer.

It is imperative and required by the insurance contract that the policyholder fully cooperate with this investigation and be precise, accurate, and truthful when responding to these inquiries. Fraud and/or misrepresentation of the smallest degree can result in complete denial of the entire claim.

When the adjuster believes that there is a possibility of the existence of an exclusion to the peril that you have reported a loss from, he is likely to seek the assistance of someone the carrier can use as an expert (should you sue) to support their use of that exclusion. This is why the carrier will hire an engineer or other expert to look at the damage. Policyholders who are in disagreement with the carrier’s decision regarding coverage of their claim and do not understand how and why insurance companies use experts will sometimes demand on their own that the insurer pays for an engineer to evaluate the damage that they believe should be paid. In doing so, they are unwittingly providing the carrier with ammunition to use against them instead of meeting their own burden to prove their loss – since the insurance company’s engineer is not going to be paid by the carrier to assist the policyholder to defend against them.

Understand the process, be fully prepared to prove that your loss or damage was caused by a covered peril when you file your claim and seek the advice of an attorney or public adjuster if you are not fully confident in handling the claim on your own or at the first sign of trouble with your insurance carrier.

 

What Is Your Burden of Proof When Filing an Insurance Claim?

 

Burden of proof with insurance claim

 

      Filing an insurance claim can be much more complicated than it first appears.  To some who have never filed a claim before, there is the assumption that all they must do is notify their insurance carrier of their loss and wait to be paid.  They are unaware that the burden to prove that covered property has been damaged or lost due to a covered peril rests entirely upon them.  Many mistakenly believe that they are entitled to be paid unless the insurance carrier can prove otherwise, which usually results in frustration and misunderstanding.

     Before deciding to file an insurance claim, a policyholder should understand two important points:

     1.  It is always the burden of the policyholder to prove that a covered peril caused damage to their covered property.

     2.  It is always the burden of the insurance provider to prove that an excluded peril caused the loss.

     Often (actually, too often) a policyholder will note a symptom of damage – such as a leak in the ceiling – and file an insurance claim for damage to their roof.  Without knowing the cause of the leak or whether that cause was due to a peril covered under their policy, they will ask their insurance carrier to send out an adjuster to pay their claim.

     The insurance company’s adjuster, whose duty is to protect the interests of the insurance company he works for, does NOT have the duty to prove that a covered peril caused the loss.  Instead, he is there to collect information and evidence to support (if necessary) his burden to prove that an excluded peril caused the loss if, indeed, it did.  When he is uncertain about his observations and the possibility of an exclusion under the policy to apply to the loss, he may seek the assistance of a third party (such as an engineer, architect, or consultant) to assist him.

     After his investigation, unlike the typical policyholder who has not prepared his case to prove that a covered peril caused damage to their covered property, the insurance carrier is fully prepared to argue against coverage with any proof that an excluded peril caused the loss that the adjuster may have found.

     Thus – knowing that they must first prove that their covered property was damaged by a covered peril – the prudent policyholder will investigate their own claim BEFORE inviting the carrier to begin their investigation of it.  Generally speaking, this is what I usually recommend:

     1.  Know, as best as you can, exactly what is damaged and what caused it.  If you are unable to determine this on your own, seek the advice of a trusted professional skilled in the material(s) that is damaged.  If your roof is leaking, for example, have a roofer find the source of the leak and the cause of that source.

     2.  Collect physical and/or photographic evidence of the damage and proof of its origin.  Obtain a bid from a trusted contractor for the cost to restore the damage to its condition prior to the loss. (Avoid allowing your contractor to negotiate directly with the carrier.  A contractor’s lack of knowledge of your coverage and his interests in profiting from the work provides the adjuster with ease in exploiting and manipulating him.)

     3.  Learn if that damage is covered under your policy.  Read your policy,  speak to your agent, or consult with your attorney or public adjuster for assistance if you are confused about your policy’s language.  Sometimes, it’s tricky.

     4.  Provide copies of your evidence to the insurance company when you file the claim or, if more convenient when the adjuster visits to inspect the property.  (If you are not confident or comfortable in doing this, hire a public adjuster to represent you with this process.)

     5.  If your insurance carrier does not cooperate with you after providing proof of your loss and coverage, seek the assistance of an attorney or a public adjuster.

 

 

Fighting the Good Fight

Fighting the good fight

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk on Pexels.com

 

     I recently read a touching and inspiring tribute written by an attorney who advocates for policyholders and who had recently lost a valuable partner and fellow advocate to cancer.  Together, they would fight the good fight. There are not enough fighters like them in this arena, and in his tribute to his partner, he described her drive and enthusiasm for battling with insurance companies on behalf of their clients.

     Being one who shares in the same fight (though not at such grand of a scale), I felt a great sense of personal loss.  Even though I did not know her, personally, I know her heart and I have shared similar pain with the clients who had purchased insurance for peace of mind but found, when disaster came to their door, that this peace was only a temporary illusion.

     Though Missouri law tasks an insurance company to provide prompt and fair assistance to its policyholders in exchange for payment of premiums, minimizing risk, and filing a claim only upon sustaining damage – some insurance companies, to protect their own financial interest, inflict more stress and financial harm upon their policyholders than the destructive event that prompted their claim, and at a time when the policyholder is most vulnerable with the least financial reserve.  Instead of providing the warm professional care and assistance projected by their televised mascots, the policyholder is frequently met with fierce opposition and obstruction intended to exasperate, wear down, and break the resolve of the most committed policyholder defending his own rights under the very insurance policy he bought for “peace of mind”.

     Fighting through a barrage of tactics used by insurance companies to delay, deny, and defend against the policyholder is certainly not an enjoyable experience for either the policyholder or his advocate.  It is, however, something that must be done in order to receive a dollar-for-dollar payment for the incurred loss.  That is the reality that is not shown on friendly and warm television commercials.

     We lost a fighter.  Who will take her place?

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders or Policyholders? Who matters most?

Photo by Polina Tankilevitch on Pexels.com

     

Shareholders or policyholders.  Who matters most?  Take this quiz:

The Board of Directors of my insurance company has a lawful duty to protect:

a.  the financial interests of the policyholders.

b. the financial interest of the stockholders.

c.  both of the above.

d.  none of the above.

The answer is (b).  The Board of Directors of an insurance company’s first (or fiduciary) duty is to the shareholders that elected them. 

This means that the financial interests of the shareholders come before those of the insured policyholder when that corporation is an insurance provider.  Profits come to a business from paying out less than what they take in.  Shareholders demand this in return for their investment.  Insurance companies comply.   Know this as you shop. 

The National Law Review has published a list of the “eleven worst insurance companies” and I encourage you to read it.  Before you take too much comfort in finding that your home insurance provider did not make the list, you should consider that many that made the list are providers of health insurance.  The factors that were used for the home and business insurers that made the list, however, are not unique to them but are commonly shared among smaller companies that would have at least made “dishonorable mention” if the list did not include other types of insurers.

     What this list should teach those of us who buy insurance is the need for us to carefully select an insurance provider based on something other than cute or funny television commercials.  Sweet talking lizards that collect your insurance premium can quickly become vicious and vexatious crocodiles defending the company against your valid claim.  If you can learn this before you become vulnerable as a result of catastrophic loss, the better off you will be.     

The Missouri Department of Insurance publishes a complaint index to help Missouri consumers determine how likely they may find displeasure with an insurance company’s claim handling process.  Considering how few unsatisfied policyholders will actually go through the red tape to file a complaint with the State government , when an insurance company exceeds the normal rate of complaints under such circumstances – it really says something.

Caveat emptor.

Why Missouri Contractors Cannot Negotiate Your Insurance Claim.

missouri contractors cannot represent your claim

Missouri contractors cannot negotiate your insurance claim on your behalf with your insurance company.  On August 28, 2011, the Governor of Missouri signed into law Senate Bill 101 which prohibits home exterior contractors from representing a policyholder or negotiating on their behalf with their insurance company for exterior work on their home as a part of an insurance claim.

Here is a link to the law:   It is very clear.  

So why do insurance companies continue to negotiate with residential contractors in spite of this law?  Perhaps it is because, when they do, they can get away with underpaying your claim.

An insurance adjuster can say things to your contractor that he cannot say to you, your Missouri attorney or your Missouri licensed public adjuster because, unlike you (and those who lawfully represent you), the contractor is not a party to the agreement (the policy) between you and the insurance company. 

Insurance adjusters will often withhold certain information from the contractor, misrepresent or not fully disclose your coverage to the contractor, and say things to your contractor such as “We are not paying that much for that building material … Your estimate is too high for labor and you need to revise that … We are not going to pay more than such and such dollars for this claim … We won’t pay your overhead and profit” … and so forth because they are not communicating with you or anyone lawfully representing you.

It would be an act of bad faith, and perhaps a vexatious act carrying severe penalties, for the adjuster to say such things to you or to your lawful representative.  Why?  Because certain communications and actions between insurance companies, their policyholders, and their lawful representatives are regulated by the Missouri Department of Insurance. Such regulations, however, do not necessarily extend to their relationships with contractors and other vendors.  In their opinion, your contractor is representing his own interests and not yours. 

For example, when an insurance adjuster makes a statement of fact regarding your coverage to you or your lawful representative, he must respond with supporting language from your policy upon demand.  Not so, however, when the same demand is made by your contractor.  Since the contractor is not a party to the agreement or lawfully representing anyone who is, he is not entitled to know all of the important information the policy contains.  Withholding this information about your specific coverage from your contractor puts him in the dark and the insurance company’s adjuster in complete control. 

Some contractors mistakenly believe that since they have worked with certain insurance companies or adjusters in the past, all policyholders with that company have the same or similar coverage – which is not true.  Three or four neighbors living side by side on the same street can be insured by the same insurance carrier and have different policies with different coverage. Some contractors quote what they believe to be “state law” as to what an insurance company must pay for which is also not true.  In Missouri, state laws do not govern or control all of the information contained in an insurance policy, and policy interpretation disputes are settled in civil court and are generally not legislated.

I hold skilled and experienced exterior contractors in very high regard. They are important advisors for you and/or your lawful representatives in settling a claim.  Their skillful and experienced input in determining the full scope of the damage and what they charge for restoration of that damage is helpful, often vital, in settling your claim.  It is when they extend beyond their valuable construction skills and expertise and go beyond the “low hanging fruit” that the adjuster would pay anyway and (as some contractors advertise) “push” the adjuster toward a larger settlement, complete documentation, communicate with the carrier on your behalf and settle your claim, those and similar actions may not be in accord with the law and their results may not produce all of the money that you are entitled to.

Most damaging is the harm some do to your claim before you finally bring in qualified and lawful representatives, such as your attorney or licensed public adjuster, to assist you.  While their lack of ability to correctly interpret your coverage or communicate your rights under the policy may have limited their ability to help you fully resolve your claim, what they communicated to the insurance company (correctly or incorrectly) can interfere with a fair resolution and must be identified and resolved before progress can be made.

I work with many exterior contractors and help them operate within the boundaries that are set forth in Senate Bill 101, allowing them to focus upon their areas of skill and expertise to fully serve their customers’ construction needs.  Their customers are able to recover from their insurers what they require to restore their home to its pre-damaged condition and the contractor makes what he bids for the work that is required.  When it is done correctly, all parties are served in a win-win position.  When it is done improperly, however, some or all come out on the losing end.

Not all claims require an attorney or a public adjuster to handle them.  In fact, most can be handled directly by the policyholder with no representation at all, if they understand their rights under their contract with the insurance company and have a skilled contractor they trust to correctly inform them of their damage and what must be done to restore their property to its pre-loss condition.

No one but you, your Missouri attorney, or your Missouri licensed public adjuster should be communicating with your insurance company on your behalf, and remember that a “no” from the insurance adjuster to your exterior contractor is not be the final word on your claim for damage.

 

 

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the work of a public adjuster, not to provide specific legal advice. The authors and/or site manager make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. By using this blog site you understand that there is no public adjuster/client relationship between you and James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster.  The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state, nor should it be used as a substitute for competent maintenance or repair advice from a qualified contractor licensed to perform work in your state.

Engineer Speak – “Functional” v. “Cosmetic” Damage

 

Photo by Laker on Pexels.com

Here is a story about how an engineer might record the functional damage versus cosmetic damage in a fictional situation, first.

Once there was a maintenance man who worked in a famous art museum and was directed by his supervisor to touch up the white paint on the wall of a certain gallery within the museum.  As he was ascending his ladder he accidentally tipped over his gallon of white paint and it splashed across the surface of a 550-year-old painting from a world famous artist that hung in the gallery.

Of course, the painting was insured and the curator immediately filed a claim.  The insurance adjuster took a few photos and shared them with his boss who said We need to send out an engineer.

The engineer arrived to examine the painting and noted that the framed canvas was designed and intended to hold paint of various colors.  Since the canvas and frame were still intact and obviously able to retain paint, he recorded that the painting was still “functional”.  The painted surface had white paint splashed across the smiling face of a woman named “Lisa” or something, but he reported the damage was only “cosmetic” in that it did not interfere with the “function” of the canvas to hold paint.  It was, after all, paint on a painting … and the gallery was filled with various paintings with random splashes and colors.  He concluded that there was no “functional” damage and the insurance company denied the claim.

This story is fictional, of course … but the actions described are quite common.

Let’s look at the shingles on your roof, for example.  The manufacturer of your shingles produces them in a wide variety of colors, shapes, and styles.  When you selected them (or selected a house that already had them), you noted their color and design in context with the features of the rest of the structure, didn’t you?  Of course, their designed purpose is to protect the roof from wear and water intrusion but they also were carefully and creatively designed to enhance the beauty of the home.

When a sudden Missouri storm erupts and pounds them with hail, along with the metal appurtenances, gutters, downspouts, and other surrounding materials, they will often be damaged.  When they are damaged, you might contact your insurance carrier to file a claim for direct physical damage or loss to your roofing materials.  The insurance adjuster will arrive, take a few photographs, and return to speak to his boss.  When the boss does not want to pay you for your damage, he might send an engineer.

The engineer will often look at your shingles and the surrounding metals for holes.  Finding none, he declares that the shingles and metals are still shedding water as they were designed to do, and the damage to them is not “functional” but merely “cosmetic”.  Based on this report, the manager may deny the claim, depending upon the language in your policy.

Denying the claim because of an engineer’s definitions of “functional” or “Cosmetic” damage rather than the insurance policy’s definitions of damage can be improper.  Try as some might, engineers neither write nor interpret Missouri insurance policies and, when they attempt to do so, they are often incorrect. Some insurance companies have been successfully sued for such actions when it happens, as in the case of North-Shore Co-Owner’s Association versus Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.

When you believe that your insurance carrier is trying harder to deny your claim than pay your claim, you may be the victim of improper claim handling, bad faith, or vexatious actions on the part of your carrier.  When this happens, seek the advice of your Missouri attorney or a Missouri licensed public adjuster. 

 

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the work of a public adjuster, not to provide specific legal advice. The authors and/or site manager make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. By using this blog site you understand that there is no public adjuster/client relationship between you and James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC.  The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state, nor should it be used as a substitute for competent maintenance or repair advice from a qualified contractor licensed to perform work in your state.

The Insurance Appraisal Clause (Simplified)

     

Insurance appraisal clause simplified

     If you are a policyholder disputing a claim with your insurance company and you have given up the fight and are ready to lose, go ahead and invoke your right to the appraisal process that your insurance company has written into their policy. It will be over quickly and if you are paid anything as a result of it, at best it will be a figure reached through compromise from what someone other than you “estimates” your loss to be with no commitment to perform any of necessary the work for the amount the appraisers and umpire “estimate” it to cost.

     There is a reason why your insurance provider wrote this clause and chose to insert it into his contract with you.  Judging by his unwillingness to pay you up to this point, that reason is probably NOT because it is likely to result in a significantly higher payment to you.  

     If, on the other hand, you are growing weary of fighting with your insurance company over a legitimate claim and you want to be fully indemnified but don’t know how to proceed to make that happen, seek the advice of either your attorney or a public adjuster licensed to practice in your state.  

     After suffering a direct physical loss to your home or commercial building, the last thing in the world you need is three people you don’t really know (none of whom will be doing the work) “guess“timating what someone else will charge you to restore it.  

     Remember this important fact:  In exchange for your premium, your insurance policy directs your insurance company to pay you what it costs (not what anyone “estimates” it to cost) to restore your property to the way it was before the loss.

     As I stated, there is a reason why your insurance company wrote this into your policy and it is obvious that the reason was NOT to pay you more money.

 

 

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the work of a public adjuster, not to provide specific legal advice. The authors and/or site manager make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. By using this blog site you understand that there is no public adjuster/client relationship between you and James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC.  The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state, nor should it be used as a substitute for competent maintenance or repair advice from a qualified contractor licensed to perform work in your state.

Who Can Represent You With Your Hail/Wind Damage Claim

Your contractor will prove to be a valuable resource to you as you present your insurance claim to your adjuster.  Without his skill and expertise, you will have a difficult time communicating all that has been damaged and the work that will be necessary to restore your home to its original condition.  

You might have read the Missouri law that states that a roofing contractor cannot represent you with your insurance claim when communicating with your insurance company about the condition of your roof. Your insurance company’s adjuster certainly has.

Specifically, it reads in part “A contractor shall not represent or negotiate, or offer or advertise to represent or negotiate, on behalf of an owner or possessor of real estate on any insurance claim in connection with the repair or replacement of roof systems, or the performance of any other exterior repair, replacement, construction, or reconstruction work.” [Missouri Revised Statute Title XXVI, Trade and Commerce, 407.25]

You can represent your hail damage claim by yourself or you may decide to hire an attorney or Missouri licensed public adjuster to represent you with your insurance claim. If you decide to have your roofing contractor do the talking for you, however, he represents only himself and his company’s financial interests in restoring your storm-damaged roof. Not you.

Accordingly, your insurance company’s adjuster will often disregard much of your contractor’s input as being self-serving … unless, of course, it serves the best interest of the insurance company to do otherwise. For instance, if your roofing contractor is willing to compromise and agree to the adjuster’s lower computer-generated estimate, the adjuster may then strike a deal with you based upon his agreement to work for the lesser amount. A roofing contractor’s opinions or arguments calling for more money or materials that differ from what the adjuster has already decided to pay, however, will likely be dismissed. As the governing regulations state, the contractor is not allowed to negotiate your claim.

A policyholder called me for assistance recently and told me that he had three different roofing contractors speak to his insurance company’s adjuster on his behalf, and all three told the adjuster that his roof required replacement. According to him – and to his dismay – the adjuster simply disregarded the arguments from all three of them and refused to pay him to replace his roof.

Of course, the policyholder was convinced that the adjuster was acting improperly and being unfair. He believed that his insurance company had a duty to accept these arguments, particularly since they came from three different contractors, as definitive proof of his loss, but he was wrong. What the policyholder’s three contractors actually presented to his adjuster were three different sales presentations for replacing his roof – none of which proved to the adjuster that the roof had been damaged by hail on the reported date of loss to the extent that it needed to be replaced.

Simply stated, the insurance company’s adjuster was not convinced by the three different contractors, each of whom is in business to sell new roofing systems, that the home required a new roofing system as a direct result of the claimed hail event.

Sometimes, the overall condition of the roof may indeed require that the roof be replaced. The roofing contractor is doing his job by correctly informing the homeowner of that need and is certainly able to observe and communicate that to the insurance adjuster. The adjuster might even agree with him regarding the overall condition of the roof – however, what is required in most cases, in order to recover money from the insurance carrier to pay for the replacement of the roof, is physical proof that the reported damage is the only cause for that condition. It has been my observation that this is the point where many roof claims presented by roofing contractors, prohibited by law to negotiate the claim on behalf of a homeowner, fall short under those limitations.

Your consultation with a reputable roofing contractor or roofing expert is an important step as you begin to prepare to present your claim to your insurance company. If you know what to request from your roofing contractor so that you can acquire and present proof of your loss to your insurance company, you can present that proof to your adjuster who, under the state rules that govern insurance claims, must respond to you on the record to the proof that you present. This is what your licensed public adjuster would do on your behalf, as well.

There are a select few high-end roofing companies in Missouri that are staffed with experienced professionals who have proven to be able to acquire and provide convincing evidence that I have used to turn claims that were initially denied by the insurance company into recoveries of $80,000.00 to $690,000.00 – but the collected evidence was presented to the insurance company by me.

In the absence of such proof of loss or if the adjuster is simply not accepting the sales presentation from the roofing contractor as being definitive, the policyholder will likely be unsuccessful in his attempt to obtain more than what the adjuster initially values the loss to be – whether the adjuster is correct or not.

Since the roofing contractor does not officially represent the policyholder with his claim, the adjuster has the freedom to totally disregard anything that the contractor directly presents to him. Where the insurance company’s adjuster must respond to your written requests in writing, he can reject arguments presented by your roofing contractor without justification or explanation. In certain instances, the insurance adjuster will go as far as to ignore or refuse to communicate with the roofing contractor on site since there is no requirement for him to do so.

Keep this in mind when you decide to ask your roofing contractor to present your roofing claim to your insurance company. A “no” to your roofing contractor from your insurance adjuster is not always the final word.

 

 

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the work of a public adjuster, not to provide specific legal advice. The authors and/or site manager make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. By using this blog site you understand that there is no public adjuster/client relationship between you and James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC.  The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state, nor should it be used as a substitute for competent maintenance or repair advice from a qualified contractor licensed to perform work in your state.

Computer Generated Estimates from Insurance Adjusters

computer generated estimates

Photo by Vitezslav Vylicil on Pexels.com

 

It may come as a surprise to you to learn that the overwhelming majority of insurance adjusters, no matter which insurance company they work for, use the same computer software to generate estimates from which they pay insurance claims.  The corporation that owns and manages the software that creates the computer-generated estimate that your adjuster is using to pay your claim is called Verisk Analytics, Inc.

When you visit this page of the website for Verisk Analytics, Inc. you will see something very interesting about its managers and Board of Directors.  Most of them, including the director that bears the title of “Lead Director” are from the insurance industry and/or have professional backgrounds in the very closely associated financial investment industry.  Very few, if any, have backgrounds or practical experience in the industries or trades associated with performing the restoration work or providing the materials that are represented in these computer-generated estimates.

This could lead a reasonable person to question whether the computer-generated estimate provided by the insurance adjuster represents the financial interests of the insurance industry managing and producing it … or the interests of the policyholder who is presumably expected to have enough money to fully restore his property from the amount estimated by the software program.

Prudent policyholders, however, will carefully read their policies and discover that their payments from their insurance companies are to be based upon the actual … and not the “estimated” … cost of restoration.  They will know that they are not limited to receive only the insurance adjuster’s home-grown estimate generated by his own industry’s managed computer software program but are entitled, instead, to the amounts that it will actually cost to replace or restore the property that is destroyed or damaged.

If they don’t know this and settle for what the computer-generated estimate guesses that their payment should be, they are likely to be underpaid for their loss.

The Improper Use of Engineers’ Reports to Deny Insurance Claims

 

As a licensed public adjuster who has negotiated millions of dollars worth of insurance claims on behalf of policyholders who have suffered damage to their homes and commercial buildings, I have overturned many claim denials that were based on reports from engineers hired by insurance companies.  Reading and contextually interpreting these reports to assist my clients, and also to provide consultation and assistance to attorneys litigating such matters, has become my own specialty within my practice.  Not all of the errors and omissions that I have uncovered in these reports were acts of fraud, incompetency, or bias; however, many were.  A few of those that were have been selected for this essay.

 

Photo by Gabby K on Pexels.com

 

Plausible Deniability

“Plausible deniability” is a strategy used to escape contractual duties that leave little or no evidence of wrongdoing or abuse.  As it applies to the claims process, plausible deniability would allow an insurance carrier to hide behind the wrongful act of someone else that would determine on their behalf that a claim should not be paid when, in fact, it should be paid.  How might this be done, and how might an engineer’s report play a part in it?

The Set-Up

For illustration purposes, let’s say that wind or hail has damaged your roof and you have consulted with a trusted and experienced roofing contractor or other roofing professional before filing your insurance claim.  Your contractor has confirmed the presence of storm damage to your roof.  Your roofing professional might have decades of practical experience and training working for a century-old roofing company, spending thousands of hours per year inspecting and repairing damaged roofs exactly like yours. He may have worked with identical materials like those on your roof hundreds of times with countless numbers of expert repairs or replacements provided to hundreds of satisfied homeowners who had hail or wind damage identical or similar to yours … but your insurance company decides to ignore your expert and bring in their “expert” to look at your roof, instead.

Your insurance company’s “roofing” expert will probably be a licensed engineer who, if he is like most engineers, has never installed or supervised the installation or repair of a roof.  His engineering specialty before becoming employed by the engineering company he now works for may have been geotechnical, water resources, electronics, or any other of the numerous variety of engineering specialties that have nothing at all to do with building materials in general or roofing materials, in particular.  Roofing materials are not structural and are not an engineering specialty.

When high winds or lightning have damaged the structure of the home, a licensed engineer is essential to the insurance carrier and the policyholder to determine and report on the structural integrity of the building and recommend the correct remedy to restore it. But why did your insurance company hire a licensed engineer to simply inspect your shingles? 

Your policy covers damage from all perils – except for those that the policy excludes from coverage.  In the absence of an exclusion, your insurance provider must pay for your covered loss.

The burden of proving that a policy exclusion applies (such as “wear and tear” or “poor workmanship”, for example) is on your insurance company.  When an insurance adjuster can find an exclusion to the policy, he will usually tell you.  When the adjuster cannot find an exclusion, rather than pay you he may recommend to his company that they hire an engineer to “find” one.  

The inspection of damaged roofing materials is not an engineering practice.  If it were, Missouri law would prohibit anyone other than a licensed engineer to do it, just as it prohibits non-engineers from performing work that requires an engineering license.  The cost of paying an engineer (usually between $1,500.00 and $2,500.00) for a report is a large percentage of what a roof on an average size private dwelling would cost to replace.  It seems extremely odd that an insurance company would not trust this routine and otherwise inexpensive process to less expensive and more experienced professionals when they are available, such as your expert or even their own adjuster.  The decision to pay an engineer to inspect your shingles does not seem to be based on skill requirements or cost-effectiveness, does it? 

Anyone is qualified by the State of Missouri to inspect and write a report on the damage found on a roof since the roof covering is not considered to be a part of the structure of the building.  It is simply there to shed water and enhance the beauty of the home.  But why an engineer?   Scroll up a few paragraphs and re-read about “plausible deniability” and it becomes more clear why an engineer report, particularly those that are typically void of science (i.e. terminal velocity calculations, measurement of material impact resistance and relevant ambient factors, etc) dovetails into a conclusion that supports an exclusion to your coverage and allows for a denial of your claim, could help the insurance company at your expense.

 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

 

Shooting Yourself in the Foot

Some policyholders will unwisely request on their own, after being told by an adjuster that he does not agree with their expert, that the insurance company hire an engineer to provide what the policyholder mistakenly believes to be an unbiased and qualified opinion about his roof.  The requested engineer is then selected, hired, and paid by the insurance company to provide them (not the policyholder) with a report that the policyholder is trusting to be independent and unbiased.  Whether requested on their own or at the urging of the policyholder, the engineer is being directed and paid by the insurance company.

Accordingly (in this example), the insurance company’s engineer provides a report to the insurance company which contradicts the finding of the experienced roofing contractor, and the insurance company concludes from that report (while ignoring the opinion of the policyholder’s expert and preferring the opinion of their expert) that the hail damage was caused by something other than hail and something that is not covered by the policy – and your claim is denied.

This happens more often than you think and more often than it should.

Follow the Money

Some of these companies that employ licensed engineers to provide these types of reports to insurance companies do not provide any other type of engineering service. Writing these reports for insurance companies is their major (or, in many cases, only) source of business income.  Sometimes, as reported by the television news program “60 Minutes” (click here), the company’s managers may change the language in the engineer’s original report to benefit an insurance company at the expense of the homeowner.  The financial incentive (usually $1,500 to $2,500 for each report, in Missouri) for future repeated business is what will often drive some of them to find creative ways to “help” the insurance company to determine that your hail (or other property damage) is not covered by the policy.  Click HERE for more examples. 

Here is an excerpt from a case that reached the Texas Supreme Court that resulted in a ruling against the insurance carrier and was critical of their bias.  I have blocked the names of the insurance company and engineer in this essay, but you can read the full case HERE and get the full story . “Some evidence also indicates that (insurance carrier) knew, when it denied the Nicolaus’ claim for the second time, that the (engineer) report did not justify denying the claim. The (rebuttal) report, which the Nicolaus provided to (insurance carrier) after (insurance carrier) initially denied the claim, discussed the moisture content of soil samples taken from four locations within the Nicolaus’ house. (Insurance carrier) referred the (rebuttal) report, which had found that water from the leak had spread throughout the soils underlying the Nicolaus’ foundation, to the same (insurance carrier’s) engineers who had prepared the initial report. There is no indication that the (insurance carrier’s) engineers did any further testing in response to the (rebuttal) report or that (insurance carrier) conducted any further investigation before denying the claim a second time.”

As most public adjusters know from the numerous engineering reports that we read and discuss with insurance companies, many of them are simple boilerplate templates with only the beginning and ending pages unique to the applicable home, and many of them lack merit or fact that would actually support a denial of an insurance claim. Unfortunately,  policyholders do not have the expertise and experience of reading enough of these reports to recognize the numerous errors, omissions, and contradictions contained within many of them and will mistakenly believe that an engineering report cannot be successfully disputed by anyone other than another engineer.

One Plus One Equals Zero

Because they don’t know better, many policyholders who have been stung by a biased, incomplete, or errant engineer’s report (or simply one they do not agree with) will insist that their insurance company “send out another engineer“.  Understanding that the engineer was hired to write the controversial report in the first place, and at a considerable sum, the insurance carrier has no incentive at all to argue with itself.  A second engineer’s report that differs at all from the first simply puts the disputed question in a “tie” – one for you and one against you.  The second report is not definitive simply because it disagrees with the first.  Requests from policyholders for the insurer to send out a second engineer for a second opinion go nowhere and even if the carrier should decide to pay for a second report, it is highly unlikely to result in the policyholder’s favor, even if the second engineer disagrees with the insurance company.

Where’s The Science?

When you read them you will find most reports written by engineers for damaged roofing materials are devoid of science and engineering, with the possible exception of boilerplate language that has been prewritten to describe commonalities that may or may not be relevant to the damage being claimed.  The part of the report that is unique to your particular roof will represent maybe as much as a third of the actual report and will typically include nothing more than a record of the engineer’s reported observations (as did the adjuster before him).

You may possibly see an opinion about how the hailstones that fell on your roof lacked speed, velocity, or density to cause damage — but you will find no calculations or references to how that speed, velocity, or density of the long-ago melted hailstone was calculated.  The use of these terms may sound impressive since it is intended to sound impressive – but is it true?  Don’t ask the engineer who wrote it.  He doesn’t really know, himself.  Often, this narrative is cut and pasted into the same engineer’s roof reports on a routine basis – which would be known only to those who read several of them – like the insurance companies that hire him (and the public adjuster who has represented multiple clients who opposed him). 

 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Examples of Bias, Fraud, and Incompetence

An engineer’s report that I received from one of these companies specified how the engineer closely examined the “clay tiles” that were chipped and found the damage to be attributed to something other than hail. He then provided a lengthy and generic boilerplate description of how “clay tiles” are made and the scientific studies of the effects of hail that strikes them.  What he failed to observe was the fact that the roof was covered with eighty-year-old concrete tiles and not clay tiles.  He not only missed the hail damage but incorrectly identified the material.

Another engineer’s report for a client that was used to deny an insurance claim for a church with a wind-damaged roof incorrectly described a tongue-in-groove roof covering as plywood sheathing, identified the wrong date (and the wrong windstorm) when he incorrectly reported low wind speeds and failed to identify and record the fact that the steeple had been lifted and moved by a 100 mph wind. This report was written by an engineer from a company commonly used by insurance carriers in several states to support their claim denials.  Whether his errors and omissions were caused by his negligence or bias is not important since his licensing board prohibits both.  When the errors that I found in the report were brought to the insurance carrier’s attention, the adjuster’s manager promptly and apologetically paid the claim to replace the steeple.

In another recent case, a different engineer from the same company went as far as to attempt to interpret the insurance policy’s coverage for the insurance carrier in his engineer report and presented that, while copper roofing material had clearly been dented by a recent hail storm, the damage “could not be seen from the ground” and was not, in his professional opinion, “damage“.  The insurance company that wrote the insurance policy and knows it better than any of its policyholders conveniently and improperly allowed this errant interpretation of coverage by the engineer to stand – knowing fully that the policy had no such exclusion for hail damage that “could not be seen from the ground“.  The insurer denied payment to the policyholder, an elderly widow, for more than two years and I was hired to intercede on her behalf.  I immediately challenged their action and reopened the claim.  My investigation revealed that the engineering company had contracted a full-time real estate salesman with an engineer’s license to perform their inspection, which explained his unusual conclusion that damage not viewed from the ground was not worthy of coverage.  The insurance company, subsequent to that disclosure from my investigation, agreed to pay the policyholder over $232,000.00 to restore the roof to its pre-damaged condition.  The engineer has reportedly returned to his full-time job of selling real estate.

As you can see from just these three recent examples, not all engineer reports reflect accuracy, competency, or non-bias, and insurance companies that use these reports to deny claims are not always acting in good faith, according to the courts who have ruled against them.  There are times when withholding money from you based upon reports that they know to be inaccurate have been considered vexatious and, through litigation in a federal or state court, have entitled policyholders to punitive damages in addition to the money owed to them.  Your attorney can provide more details in this area.

Also worthy of note are the instances in which the engineer’s report is, by design or negligence, written in an ambiguous manner that allows facts about the damage that could benefit the policyholder’s claim to be manipulated in favor of the insurance company. Most policyholders are not trained or able to fully screen and comprehend detailed engineering reports.  In one recent claim in 2019, for example, an engineer report that accurately described and reported damage to a commercial building was wrongfully interpreted by the insurance company to deny a claim that, after I reopened it and challenged their interpretation, resulted in a check to my client for over $692,000.00.  Prudent policyholders will arrange to have their insurance denial letters and accompanying engineer reports reviewed by a public adjuster or attorney before walking away from their claim.

Sometimes, what the engineer actually reported was not correctly communicated to the policyholder by his insurance adjuster. In one case, the insurance company denied coverage to a church for interior damage caused by water entering from a roof damaged by hail. The adjuster told the church that the engineer concluded that the interior damage was from “wear and tear” and not subsequent to the hail damage. The people at the church hired me to assist them.

Several weeks after demanding a copy of the report so that I could review it myself, the insurance carrier reluctantly complied with my request. The report did NOT say what they told the policyholder it said. Though the engineer did his best to present the facts in such a way to support the insurance company’s denial,  his ambiguity and double-talk did not fully discount the hail damage as a source of water to the interior. The insurance company finally agreed to pay the church $59,000.00 to cover the water damage to the interior of their building.

There are many more stories that I can share but I think, by now, you get the point.  There are times when neither the insurance carrier nor the engineer writing a report should have the final word.

What can you do if you are working the claim on your own?

While some state Departments of Insurance may not find biased, ambiguous, or erroneous engineer reports to be something they wish to handle or spend political capital, there are often other departments within state government that are able to act to preserve the integrity of the engineering profession and, in turn, protect the public from licensed engineers who are acting in an incompetent or biased manner.

Licensed professional engineers in Missouri are accountable for their acts of bias and/or negligence to the state board that issues their licenses.  Accordingly, home insurance policyholders that believe they are victims of an improper relationship between their insurance company and an engineering company may have recourse through the Missouri Board For Architects, Professional Engineers, Professional Land Surveyors, and Professional Landscape Architects.

Formal complaints from homeowners that have merit will be investigated by the board, and action can be taken against the engineer when it is appropriate. Engineers who write reports for insurance companies to use to deny claims that contain incorrect, partial, or biased information will have to justify their actions (if they can) to their respective licensing boards that monitor and enforce competency and impartiality. Their actions, if found to be due to incompetence or partiality, could result in sanctions up to and including fines and forfeiture of their licenses and these findings can be used by homeowners to address their denial or underpayment through the proper channels available to them … through their policies or judicial means.

Enough enforcement actions taken against licensed engineers that participate in the practice of routinely providing insurance companies with undue “plausible deniability” used in their refusal to pay legitimate claims could effectively reduce this threat to policyholders seeking to be indemnified for their losses.

 

[Note:  Policyholders should also take care to ensure that the engineer report was actually written by a state-licensed engineer.  In some cases, these damage inspections are conducted by contractors,  consultants, home inspectors, and others who are not licensed engineers and the reports that they compose are subsequently sent to engineers to sign and affix their seal before forwarding them to an insurance company for their use. When you find the inevitable errors or omissions in these reports resulting from the unprofessional inspection or observation and report them to the insurance company, be certain that the insurance company is not responding to you with advice from the same unlicensed consultant rather than a licensed engineer. I have communicated with some insurance adjusters who, themselves, weree not aware of the difference.]

 

 

This Blog/Web Site is made available by James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster LLC for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the work of a public adjuster, not to provide specific legal advice. The authors and/or site manager make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. By using this blog site you understand that there is no public adjuster/client relationship between you and James H. Bushart, Public Adjuster.  The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state, nor should it be used as a substitute for competent maintenance or repair advice from a qualified contractor licensed to perform work in your state.

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