Home Insurance Claim Highlights – 2013

As a very busy summer draws to a close, here are some of the highlights from the season’s most interesting claims.

1. The insurance company had delayed a response to a fire claim for six months. The home owner called me and soon after received an initial payment of $111,000.00 which, upon further review, was underpaid. We recovered an additional $14,000.00 a few weeks later.

2. The insurance company denied the church’s claim for storm damage to its steeple and interior. Their roofing contractor referred them to me and we soon recovered the full amount to repair the steeple, repair the damage to the interior of the church and to replace a section of the roof.

Damaged by 100 mph wind, this steeple was allowing water to flow into the church.

Damaged by 100 mph wind, this steeple was allowing water to flow into the church.

3. The insurance company denied a claim for damages to a home caused by a dishonest contractor. His financial advisor referred his client to me and we turned that “no” into a check for $10,000.00 and a waived $5,000 deductible (total value, $15,000.00).

4. The insurance company denied a claim for hail damage to his roof and my client’s roofing contractor referred him to me. We turned that “no” into a new roof.

5. The insurance company had refused to address the storm damage to her home and my client was referred to me by a friend. In a matter of weeks, we turned that “no” into a several thousands of dollars and a new roof.

6. The insurance company had said “no” and denied coverage to a storm damaged deck. My client was referred to me by a real estate agent. We turned that “no” into $16,400 for a rebuilt second story deck.

7. The insurance company had denied his roof claim stating that the storm with golf ball sized hail did not damage his roof. My client called me after finding me on the internet. We turned that “no” into over $21,000.00 for a new roof and gutter.

We did well on many other storm, theft and fire claims, as well. I’m looking forward to Autumn.

 

Copyright 2013 James H. Bushart

One response

  1. From my understanding, insurance companies can be slow in movement. Remember, all concerned do get emotional. It is quite understandable considering an unfortunate event had taken place and all involved are nervously awaiting for normalcy after a negative ordeal.

    That was an interest read.
    Best regards.
    Robert Young

    Like

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